Faked or not, CATFISH Reveals the Dark Side of Social Networks (now on Blu-ray and DVD)


Don't let anyone tell you what it is.

Provocative.
Mysterious.


Mondo Kane's picture
Joe
Ross


Don't let anyone tell you what it is.

Provocative.
Mysterious.
Entertaining.


In late 2007, filmmakers Ariel Schulman and Henry Joost sensed a story unfolding as they began to film the life of Ariel's brother, Nev. They had no idea that their project would lead to the most exhilarating and unsettling months of their lives. A reality thriller that is a shocking product of our times, Catfish is a riveting story of love, deception and grace within a labyrinth of online intrigue.

"This is the kind of absorbing, twisty cautionary tale that Hollywood pays screenwriters millions to confect."
—Washington Post

"CATFISH is absolutely riveting... What emerges is a tense, more-than-a-little-disturbing study of the relationship between artist and their fans (and between virtual friendships and real relationships)."
—Noel Murray, A.V. Club

"Jaw-dropping and surprisingly kind-hearted considering the circumstances."
—Hollywood Reporter Staff, Hollywood Reporter

"The facts in the film are slippery, but the revelation of a human personality is surprisingly moving."
—Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

"CATFISH's strength lies in its editing. Visually it integrates online media in a way that many films have tried and failed to do."
—Sam Davies, Sight and Sound

"A cautionary tale for the computer age... The end result is a compulsive, propulsive study of relationships virtual and real."
—Neil Smith, Total Film

"The film nails the social networking zeitgeist — and its predatory urban myths — better than any movie in memory."
—Simon Crook, Empire

Universal Home Entertainment and Relativity Media presents: CATFISH — on Blu-ray & DVD »
(Now available - released January 4)

Catfish (HD Trailer - 2:21)


This 'fish' is sure to hook the viewer!

CATFISH is a 2010 American documentary involving a man being filmed by his friends as he builds a romantic relationship on the social networking website Facebook with an attractive girl, and the mysterious results when they all go to visit her.

The film received a 82% "fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes, the site's consensus being "Catfish may tread the line between real-life drama and crass exploitation a little too unsteadily for some viewers' tastes, but its timely premise and tightly wound mystery make for a gripping documentary".

TIME Magazine did a full page article, written by Mary Pols in a September 2010 issue, saying "as you watch Catfish, squirming in anticipation of the trouble that must lie ahead — why else would this be a movie? — you're likely to think this is the real face of social networking."

At the 2010 Sundance Film Festival, Alison Willmore of IFC described it as a "sad, unusual love story." John DeFore of The Hollywood Reporter called Catfish "jaw-dropping" and "crowd-pleasing" but said that it "will require clever marketing in order to preserve the surprises at its core." Kyle Buchanan of Movieline asked if "easily the most buzzed-about documentary" at Sundance had "a truth problem", and reported that an audience member questioned whether it was a documentary at all. Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times referred to these questions as a "severe cross-examination" and stated his belief that "everyone in the film is exactly as the film portrays them.

In an interview, director Ariel Schulman related that some viewers believe Catfish to be a fake documentary, a hoax: Morgan Spurlock, director/star of the documentary Super Size Me, walked up to the producers of the film during one of its initial screenings and told them "it was the best fake documentary he had ever seen". Comedian Zach Galifianakis also has stated that he does not believe the events in the film to be true.

The Schulman brothers and co-director/produce Henry Joost stand behind their original statements: the film is "100% true" and it tells the story exactly how it happened. They also chalk up the perfect timing of every narrative element in the movie to just coincidence and sheer luck. Read more from The Hollywood Reporter about whether it is faked or not.

Ariel Schulman has stated that:

"It felt [too perfect] to us also, as we were making it. We're very lucky. We look back at our experience and everything leads to [the moment we discovered things were not what they seemed]. As filmmakers we were ready; we felt like we spent our lives preparing to be ready, and it just happened to be me who shares the office with my brother and my producing partner."

(Additional related CATFISH News Links below)

CATFISH on Blu-ray is now available at the suggested retail price of $39.98, and the DVD edition available for $29.98.

BONUS FEATURES include: (Blu-ray & DVD)
• Secrets Revealed: Exclusive Interview with the Filmmakers

Blu-ray Exclusive:
• My Scenes
• BD Live enabled
• pocket BLU App

Catfish (HD Trailer #2 - 1:57)


CATFISH — Explore further:
—> Visit the film's Official Site »
(from Universal Pictures) - Enter Nev's World - a unique 'online' experience for discovering more about the film

—> View the Theatrical Trailer (w/HD) »
(from Apple.com Trailers website)

—> EXCLUSIVE: New Lawsuit Seeks to Expose Truth Behind 'Catfish' »
(recent news from The Hollywood Reporter - Dec 3)

—> Inside 'Catfish': A Tale of Twisted Cyber-Romance »
(ABC-TV 20/20 report about the origins and controversy over 'Catfish')

—> 'Catfish' Producers Dish on Film »
(ABC-TV Interview with Andrew Jarecki, Brett Ratner and Ryan Kavanaugh on Catfish's journey to theaters)

"The film is a vérité-style meditation on the construction of personal identity in the age of friending, sexting, and otherwise living life by one's typing thumbs."
—Lisa Schwarzbaum (Entertainment Weekly)

"A fresh and intriguing experience... This suspenseful documentary about a virtual friendship could be a companion piece to the upcoming THE SOCIAL NETWORK."
—Claudia Puig (USA Today)

Rated PG-13 for some sexual references

FILM SYNOPSIS:
Don't let anyone tell you what it is.
Provocative.
Mysterious.
Entertaining.


In late 2007, filmmakers Ariel Schulman and Henry Joost sensed a story unfolding as they began to film the life of Ariel's brother, Nev. They had no idea that their project would lead to the most exhilarating and unsettling months of their lives. A reality thriller that is a shocking product of our times, Catfish is a riveting story of love, deception and grace within a labyrinth of online intrigue.

Filmmakers Ariel Schulman and Henry Joost document a story involving Ariel's brother, Nev, a 24-year-old New York-based photographer, and Abby, an 8-year-old artist from rural Michigan who contacts Nev via Facebook, asking for permission to make a painting from one of his photographs.

Love and identity become twisted across the lines of the Internet in this documentary from filmmakers Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman. Nev Schulman is a photographer who one day received a surprising e-mail message -- Abby, an eight-year-old girl in Michigan, had seen his picture in a newspaper and wanted permission to paint a portrait from it. Nev gave his OK, and when he was given a copy of the painting, he was struck by how good it was, assuming that the girl was either a genius or a fraud. Nev tried to contact Abby's family, and somehow ended up in contact with Megan, Abby's sexy 19-year-old sister.

As Nev fell into an increasingly complicated on-line relationship with Megan, he decided it was time to meet her in person, but when he traveled to Michigan and tracked her down, Nev learned that Abby and Megan's family were not at all what he expected them to be. Ariel Schulman, Nev's brother, began filming his brother's adventures from his first contact with Abby, and in CATFISH he and Henry Joost tell this strange story from beginning to end. CATFISH received its world premiere at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival.